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Remembering Our Visit to the MET in NYC

Remembering Our Visit to the MET in NYC

Gauguin at the MET

A few weeks ago, my grown up daughter Amanda who lives in New York, made a trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. She had visitors from California who wanted her to play tour guide and the MET was on their list of places to visit. The visitors paid for an official tour but Amanda wanted to browse the museum all on her own.  She enjoyed three glorious hours wandering by herself through the galleries. Afterwards, she sent me some images and her comments reminded me of my visit to the MET a few years ago with my boys.

She felt that many of the paintings were her “old friends” since we had studied them in the past as part of our art appreciation. She actually felt a connection with several of the paintings and marveled as I did that seeing paintings in person had such an emotional impact on her.

MET in NYC

I shared our experiences at the MET in this entry: Metropolitan Museum of Art – Harmony Art Mom’s Visit.

Here’s what I wrote in that entry about seeing a particular painting by Renoir:

“Renoir’s brushes painted this painting. He stood right where I was standing to create this artwork, capturing a moment in time for me to enjoy over a hundred years later. How awesome is that?”

I invite you to click over and read the entire entry…so many great thoughts to encourage you to visit the MET.

Art appreciation is something our family has enjoyed for many years together. It has created a bond and mutual respect and awe for many artists and styles of art. We didn’t do anything extraordinary to make this happen; just by taking a few minutes on a regular basis to view a piece of artwork, we were able to grow a love of great art.

Favorite Klimt

My daughter sent me a postcard from the MET of one of my favorite paintings…which just happened to be her favorite of the day. Here is a bit of what she wrote on the postcard:

“I bought this postcard to send to you before we talked and you said it was your favorite Klimt….I kept wishing all day you were here with me. Thank you for teaching me about the great artists. I love that I can recognize different painters’ styles from across the gallery.”

tips-for-a-visit-to-an-art-museum

You may also be interested in reading this entry:

Tips for a Family Visit to the Art Museum

Harmony Fine Arts What is in each plan

I would love for you to consider using Harmony Fine Arts plans in your family to create a love of great art and music. The plans are flexible and can be used by multiple ages all together in a matter of minutes per week. Each grade gives you specific artists and composers to study by giving you links and resources in a simple format. You really can just open the plans, click, and view/listen. You can download sample weeks and see the plans in action by visiting the Harmony Fine Arts store and clicking the particular grade you are interested in using. Make sure to click the “more information” link found on each product link for more details about each year plan.

Harmony Fine Arts Grades 1 thru 8 Button

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Creative Mom – August 2017

Creative Mom August 2017

Planner mom

There hasn’t been much time to be creative in the traditional sense this month. We were gone for a quick visit to California and then had another house guest. On top of that, two of our sons have come home to stay awhile as they prepare for their next adventure. It’s been another month of change.

Garden plans 2018

On the creative side, I’m still working on a garden plan and am starting to have a clear vision for what we need to include: patio space, small fenced flower garden area, increased native plant garden, some of the yard art that I’ve been pinning on Pinterest, and a small area to build a tent platform for visitors who come in the summer and want to experience the great Oregon outdoors.

Shutterfly prints

I’m starting to think that summers here in Oregon will be for outdoor living and the rest of the year will be for more indoor activities. This means my much neglected scrapbook will not be forgotten in the winter time and my crocheting and stitching will become more of a priority when the winter storms are rolling in. It will be a new yearly rhythm to my life, dictated by the temperatures. We have a wood stove and the wood is all in the shed in anticipation of a change in the weather.

For the first time in forever I am looking forward to autumn because I am ready for a new way of seeing the world through my Oregon experiences.

“The habit of storing mental images can’t be overrated. It can comfort us and refresh us. Even in our busiest times, we can stop and take a mini-vacation in our own piece of nature to be refreshed and gladdened by ‘the silence and calm of things that can’t speak or feel.”
Charlotte Mason, volume 1 page 50

In the meantime, before the weather does turn cold here, I’m going to be squeezing in as much outdoor time as possible. When I’m in the deep winter, I will have lots of mental images from my summer and fall to remember fondly.

Creative Things To Come

Although I find it hard to make time for creative things right now, I know it lifts my spirits when I make that time, even if it’s only 15 or 20 minutes. It keeps my mind occupied with positive thoughts.

  1. Finish my crocheted dishcloths.
  2. Scrapbook!
  3. Find a book or two to read!
  4. Beading- I’ve been gathering the supplies all summer to create some beaded necklaces and bracelets.
  5. Garden plan
  6. Letter writing! I am going to be making time for more letter writing now that I have so many distant friends to keep in contact with.

You may be interested in this entry:

Reviving the Habit of Letter Writing

Can Gardening Fulfill a Neglected Need in Us?

Fall Garden Post (with Charlotte Mason)

 

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Mother’s Journal – July 2017

My lack of posting here on Harmony Art Mom should have clued you in to the fact that life sort of ran away with me. The days were filled to the brim with good things, both here at home and on the East Coast as I visited with my kids. I know many of you subscribe to my Handbook of Nature Study blog and follow me on Instagram, so you saw some of the highlights as they unfolded.

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Selfie with 3 of my 4 children- July 2017

But, here in this entry, I am going to keep my focus and talk about my mama thoughts. For those that keep track, I now have two children in their early 30’s and two in their early 20’s. Hardly seems possible!  I’m still anxious for them as they navigate the world on their own. The two younger boys will be coming to stay with my husband and me for a short time starting in late August. They have not led conventional ‘after high school graduation’ lives. There has been no real college. Much of what they’ve done is volunteer work. But, in my estimation, they have both grown in skills and qualities that will make them amazing men.

I hate to talk too much about them and their specific paths on the internet for their privacy’s sake. But I will relate an experience that made me know this has been the right direction for these two particular boys.

Mr. A is my child that was always busy building things, creating things, and tinkering with tools. He is a visual spatial learner who spent lots of time figuring out how things work. Everyone loves Mr. A because he’s an easy going and friendly sort of person. College would have squashed Mr. A, but it has worried me that he couldn’t find the kind of job he would be happy in unless he did some kind of college, perhaps a technical trade school. Mamas worry about things like that.

I was also worried when he decided to move so far away from home that I couldn’t “finish” training him. He was only 19 when he moved to New York. He seemed too young to be off on his own.

I needn’t have worried.

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He started with one job and switched several times, landing in his “dream” position. Remember, this is the RC helicopter, airplane pilot, video making, LEGO maniac child. What do you get when you mix all that together? You get a drone camera operator! This was a sweet spot for him and he balanced that with being the head of a crew of women old enough to be his much older sisters.  As this position unfolded, I could see the drone operator part easily enough but the leading of four women sort of made me raise my eyebrows. Mr. A supervising four women? We talked several times on the phone about how to handle the emotional side of leading women…something he had little experience with.

Well, a few weeks ago when I visited him at work, I was greeted by these 4 young women with big hugs. They had actually asked if I could come in and meet them because they wanted to thank me for raising such a great son. They all had nothing but good things to say about how he treated them, how they felt he listened, and how he created a team atmosphere that got things done. One of them told me how they appreciated Mr. A’s diverse skills and willingness to learn.

This humbled me and made my heart soar.

It’s all going to be okay.

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Love this girl!

I don’t care what my children do for work if it allows them to grow in skills and character. I walked out of there with my head and shoulders held high. I had learned a valuable lesson. Create in your children the eagerness to learn and grow, to be humble when they need to learn something, and to allow them to take a chance on a job that might not be exactly what you want in the beginning and see where it takes them.

For homeschooling moms that are in the trenches of homeschooling young boys, hang in there and remember that working on good character qualities will be the foundation of any future success your child will achieve.

I continue to be humbled as a “homeschool” mama.

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